Turkey

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Turkey

Turkey, south-west of Cappadocia. Narrow tracks lead to less photographed viewpoints on mountains and volcanoes.
Turkey, Cappadocia. Fairy chimneys.
Turkey, area of Karapinar. We could not quite make it all the way up this steep volcanic slope covered with ashes as slippery as soft sand.
Turkey. In the background to the right, a volcanic cone stands in the middle of Meke crater lake. To the left, a volcanic eruption left a 200-meter deep depression. Can you imagine winching all the way back up?
Turkey, Cappadocia. A thick layer of volcanic ashes has been carved by rain and running water.
Turkey, Cappadocia. From the lava flows which used to cover such soft tuf, only remain today those funny stone caps protecting tuf formations from further erosion caused by the rain. They are poetically called "fairy chimneys".
Turkey, Cappadocia. An example of the famous troglodyte dwellings carved in cliffs or even in fairy chimneys.
Turkey, Anatolia. Lake Meke is a crater lake in the middle of which a huge volcanic cone and several smaller ones have developed.
Turkey. Lake Beysehir, possibly the most deeply turquoise lake in Anatolia.
Turkey. Izmir or Smyrna is mainly a modern city, after having gone through earthquakes and fires. It looks oddly similar to the Greek city of Tessaloniki, with which exchanges of populations were orchestrated in 1922 by the Greek and Turkish administrations.
Southwestern Turkey, Bergama. An antique city built on high ground, its spectacularly steep theater can be spotted from far away.
Turkey, Safranbolu. This charming little town in the north of the country is famous for its "konagi", its traditional Ottoman houses. Its name derives from "saffron" a spice still used today to flavor lukums, sweets in a delicate shade of yellow.
Turkey, Istanbul. When night falls upon the roofs of the Suleyman mosque and the Golden Horn. Its deep bay leads many ships to the Bosphorus.